Ditto

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I love hip hop as well, and I like its diversity (allowing me to pick & choose). My taste goes in cycles. At times, my scope is narrow; other times, I consciously try to be more open to things that I may not ordinarily listen to. Right now, I’m in a state more aligned with the former. I usually make judgments (perhaps quickly at times) as to whether I like something based on the artist’s background. I love emcees and beatmakers who demonstrate a clear knowledge and respect for music (playing an instrument is a bonus but not a requirement). J Dilla – crazy beats; clearly knew music, innately it would seem. This quick litmus test is the reason I love guys like Madlib, Common, Pharrell, and Aloe Blacc. I listen to their music, and I can hear somebody who is an artist, lyrically or otherwise.

Often times, perhaps to a fault, I write guys off who I don’t think know jack about or respect music; guys who rely heavily on an image or gimmick to make a quick buck. Often, these gimmicks are built on perpetuating some stereotypical image, or some cheap topic, e.g. “how delightful it is to receive sexual gratification from this select bevy of women.” Like Kyle mentioned, I’ve too have become more sensitive to this as I read about real issues, for example, family dynamics in urban areas. It seems to me, while I claim to be no advertising expert, that a significant amount of this music is targeted at impoverished areas. Songs that make light of “beat[ing] the p*$sy up” are heard by children (despite the stickered warning). This, I find, is problematic for children who are internalizing these messages. Research has demonstrated that misogynistic lyrics have a similar effect as pornography on male listeners. Note that the subjects in most research has been college males (due to some ethical obligation not to expose young children to pornographic material, seen, heard, or otherwise) – think of the impact on an 8-year old who is still formulating his or her gender roles and identity. This doctor (Dr. Michael Rich), drawn at random (i.e. not hired by me) suggests in an interview with Tolerance.org that:

“The connection to misogynistic music and behavior may be evident in other areas of young people’s lives, too, says Dr. Michael Rich, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Boston and spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Media Matters campaign.

“The music portrays this kind of dating violence and coercion around sexual activity as normal relationships,” said Rich.

“I see an acceptance among teenagers – both girls and boys, of the kind of sexual objectification celebrated in this kind of music. There is this notion that it’s okay to be used for sex and that there is not any emotional commitment necessary.”

That being said, it’s often difficult to draw the line to what I like or dislike; when do I use my musical judgment? When do I use my social judgment? Which brings me to Kyle’s post on positive rappers. I try to always give props to emcees who present lyrics that sound thoughtful…or even attempt to push a prosocial message. For example, Common’s “Love is” from Be. (Dilla, Dilla, Dilla). On it, Com explores the travels & travails of love in the ghetto. Also, The Procussion’s “Water’s Edge,” where they preach respect and love for others in a way that is still hip hop. The end soliloquy is one of my favorites , right up there with Common’s Pop’s monologues. (By the way, keep an ear open for Blu)

For me, the question always remains, how much art and I willing to sacrifice for social responsibility, or vice versa. I don’t pretend to know, nor do I think I’ll ever figure it out. Like other forms of art, a lot depends on feeling, something immeasurable, and situational. I’m satisfied knowing that for every gimmick, there’s an artist with integrity, artistic and/or social.

All I know is, “if I don’t like it, I don’t like it, it don’t mean that I’m hatin,” Com.

Peace

Armstrong, E. (2001). Gangsta misogyny: A content analysis of the portrayals of
violence against women in rap music, 1987-1993. Journal of Criminal Justice and
Popular Culture, 8
(2), 96-126.

Barongan, C., & Hall, C. N. (1995). The influence of misogynous rap music on sexual
aggression against women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 19, 195-207.

P.S. The above are just some example studies that explore the misogynistic influence of “rap” music. Kyle & I are trying to run a clean ship here so I did not link to the original studies, although I think you would have needed a password to access them even if I had. There is plenty of similar research out there, as well as the specific damage done to young boys. For a great read, check out Raising Cain by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson.

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One Response to “Ditto”

  1. RE: RE: Hot « Trading Tapes Says:

    […] RE: RE: Hot “For me, the question always remains, how much art and I willing to sacrifice for social responsibility, or vice versa. I don’t pretend to know, nor do I think I’ll ever figure it out. Like other forms of art, a lot depends on feeling, something immeasurable, and situational. I’m satisfied knowing that for every gimmick, there’s an artist with integrity, artistic and/or social.” – Me […]

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